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Course Directory

:: Course Offerings

The course offerings at Clarion University of PA go through an extensive review process by the Committee on Courses and Programs of Study (CCPS).  This course offerings list is a comprehensive list of courses that could be offered; it does not mean they are currently being offered.

For a complete list of courses offered on the current or upcoming schedules, see the Registrar's page Schedule of Classes.

To start a new search enter the course number of the subject or title you are searching in the box below.



Course Id (currently sorted in Ascending order) Course TitleCourse Description
ES 455
Field Methods in Geoscience
Field-based course provides upper-level undergraduates hands-on experience in hydrogeology, meteorology, bedrock, and surficial geology projects. Group projects include GIS-based analysis of a small watershed, geologic mapping, and measurement of a s,tratigraphic section, soils and terrace mapping, and surveying a strip mine remediation site. Emphasizes proper use of traditional and state-of-the-art instruments and equipment. Prerequisites: ES 150 and ES 330. Offered Summer Session I annually.|
ES 460
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
ES 470
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. These include an entire sequence of build,ing spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 (can be waived by instructor),. Fall, annually.|
ES 476
Sci Tech & Soc: Topics
Interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint students with information, curricula and teaching methodologies appropriate for integrating STS topics into science and social studies instruction. Includes topics in nature of science, history of scien,ce, history of technology, ethical decision-making, and the influences of changes in sciecne and technology on society. Required for all secondary science and social studies education majors. Spring semester. Prerequisite: Junior Standing|
ES 481
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
ES 490
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem solving in applied settings. Lecture and application-/project-based. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduce stud,ents to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 470. Each Spring Semester.|
ES 500
Intro Arphoto Int Rem Sens
Study and assessment of the physical and cultural features of the earth using satellite images and aerial photographs. Uses black and white photos, color infrared photos, and digital satellite images for planimetric map construction, agricultural and, vegetation studies, landform identification, land use assessment, and forestry. Laboratory activities include analysis of imagery in different zones of the electromagnetic spectrum, geometric correction of satellite images, and computer-assisted lan,d cover classification. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or permission of instructor. Fall semester.|
ES 525
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Builds on the content of Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation and Remote Sensing. Uses Earth imaging satellites, such as Lansat, SPOT, and Ikonos, and introduces new instruments, including Radarsat, Space Shuttle, and Space Station earth imagine,instruments. Examines various digital data sets including digital elevation models (DEMS), digital orthophotos and digital topographic maps. Students will work together on a drainage basin study to assess the sources of acid pollution using computer-,assisted land cover classification, manual photo interpretation, and field reconnaissance to identify trip mine areas and acid discharging oil/gas wells. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 500. Spring, annually.|
ES 550
Field Geography w/Lab
Systematic study of techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn techniques and procedures of compass traversing, plane tabling, rural and urban land use survey,ing, and field research. Prerequisite: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.|
ES 555
Field Meth Environ Geos
Field-based course designed to give upper-level students hands-on experience in various aspects of hydrogeology, surficial geology and meteorlogy. Emphasis on principles and practice of the most recent field and laboratory techniques of instrumentati,on, sampling, and monitoring as applied to relevant environmental problems. Prerequisite: ES 260, 280, and 330. Summer session, on demand.|
ES 560
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
ES 570
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. Lab includes an entire sequence of buildi,ng spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 or permission of instructor. F,all, annually.|
ES 581
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
ES 590
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem-solving in applied setting. Lecture- and application/project-based course. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduc,e students to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 570. Spring, annually.|
FIN 170
Intro To Finance
Introduces students to the rudiments of finance and elementary financial decision making. Surveys the basics of investments, financial management, and financial markets and institutions. No prerequisites. Annually.|
FIN 370
Financial Management
Examines the acquisition, management, and analysis of short-term and long-term funds both in the domestic and international environment. Emphasizes financial analysis, time value of money and valuation of securities, working capital management, capit,al budgeting under certainty and uncertainty, risk and return, cost of capital, and the optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ECON 212 and ACTG 252. Each semester.|
FIN 371
Interm Finance
In-depth study of corporate financial issues that face today's financial manager. Students learn to incorporate risk into capital budgeting decisions; study mergers and acquisitions; analyze bankruptcies, reorganizations, and lease financing; and stu,dy other advanced financial issues prevalent in today's domestic and multinational corporations. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Annually.|
FIN 373
Fund Of Insurance
A study of the concept of risk management and the several methods for handling risks. Emphasizes insurance as transfer method. Discusses fundamental principles of insurance, insurance as a contract, and the insurance policy, including property and li,ability coverage, life and health, and social insurance. Annually.|
FIN 374
Prop/Casualty Ins
In-depth study of property and liability risk exposures, personal and commercial lines, production, underwriting, claims, ratemaking, and loss control functions as well as regulations of insurance. Prerequisite: FIN 373. Spring, annually.|
FIN 375
Mgmt Finan Inst
Descriptive analysis of the operations of financial institutions, such as commercial banks, savings banks, insurance companies. Examines techniques and principles involved in the management of financial institutions. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and FIN 3,70. Annually.|
FIN 376
Investments
Examines investment goals and the current environment for investments, including the nature of the investment process and securities markets; analysis of risk and return, especially as it applies to common stocks, preferred stocks, and bonds; introdu,ction to portfolio management and portfolio theory. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Fall, annually.|
FIN 377
Medical Care Fin
The role of a financial manager in the health care setting. A study of the theoretical and analytical procedures involved in medical fund raising, capital budgeting, expense analysis, rate structuring, and hospital asset management as well as other f,inancial abilities required in the operation and planning of modern health care facilities. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Offered on demand.|
FIN 378
Personal Finance
This course will contain a review of each of the major segments of personal finance, including the financial planning process, cash budgeting, credit card and debt management, investing, insurance policies and strategies, tax planning strategies, ret,irement plans, employee benefits, and estates, wills, and trusts. This course is not available for Personal Finance majors or for any student who has completed FIN 474: Personal Financial Planning. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor's per,mission. Fall, biennially.|
FIN 399
Special Topics
Presents various current topics in finance theory and practice. Covers different topics from year to year, as subjects of importance are identified. Prerequisite: FIN 370. On demand.|
FIN 463
Tax Planning
Acquaints students with tax planning techniques that can be used to accomplish an individual's financial goals. Enables students to suggest actions that fit the individual's financial priorities based on an understanding of financial position, cash f,low and income, gift and estate tax matters. Prerequisite: ACTG 353.|
FIN 471
Financial Problems
Capstone course challenges students to integrate and synthesize, through case methods, their knowledge in finance. Emphasizes corporate finance in application of theoretical underpinning, but some cases also will deal with investments, financial inst,itutions, and markets. Prerequisite: FIN 371.|
FIN 473
Retrmnt Est Plan
An overview of individual income taxation, including an in-depth look at pensions, profit sharing, and other deferred compensation plans, estates, trusts, and applicable tax laws. Prerequisite: FIN 463. Once annually.|
FIN 474
Personal Financial Planning
Capstone course requires that students apply through case studies, written reports, and presentations each of the major segments of personal financial planning including the financial planning process, ethical and professional considerations of finan,cial planning, insurance policies and strategies, risk management, investment vehicles, tax planning strategies, retirement plans and employee benefits, and estate planning. Students are encouraged to complete the other courses within the Personal F,inancial Planning major prior to or contemporaneous with completion of this course. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Spring, annually.|
FIN 476
Portfolio Theory & Mgmt
Examines modern portfolio theory and its application to investment strategies; study of options and future markets; investigation of market efficiency. Prerequisite: FIN 376. Annually|
FIN 480
Multinational Finance
Examines the theory and practice of financial management in the multinational firms. Focuses on important differences between domestic and international financial decision-making. Prerequisite: FIN 370.|