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:: Course Offerings

The course offerings at Clarion University of PA go through an extensive review process by the Committee on Courses and Programs of Study (CCPS).  This course offerings list is a comprehensive list of courses that could be offered; it does not mean they are currently being offered.

For a complete list of courses offered on the current or upcoming schedules, see the Registrar's page Schedule of Classes.

To start a new search enter the course number of the subject or title you are searching in the box below.



Course Id (currently sorted in Ascending order) Course TitleCourse DescriptionLevel
ANTH 211
Humans And Culture
Introduces students to the nature of humanity and the human condition by exploring contemporary and past societies. Applies the four-field approach, emphasizing human diversity, origins of humans and culture, language, and archaeology. Each semeste,r.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 213
Intro To Bioanthropology
Surveys the human species in time, place, and culture, and investigates factors underlying human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 211, or one semester in Biology. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 214
Prin Human Ecology
Examines the functional interrelationships of humankind and the biophysical environment. No prerequisite. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 216
Women And Culture
Introduces the study of the lives of women in cross-cultural perspective. Explores gender issues including sexual division of labor, inequality, changing position of women in families, and the role of women in development. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 217
Intro to Archaeology
Introduces students to theory and methods used in archaeological inquiry. Explores the history of archaeology, key researchers in the field, and important discoveries.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 218
Buried Cities & Lost Civ
Introduces students to archaeology and to what archaeologists do. Provides a long-term perspective on human history starting with the first archaeological sites over 2.5 million years old. Addresses some of the more popular theories about the prehist,oric human past. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 242
Intro To Amer Folklore
Introduces the major genres of American folklore: legend, tale, folk belief, song and ballad, and material folk culture; and various folk groups in America: occupational, gender, ethnic, age, regional, and their traditions. Analyzes examples of Am,erican literature and American popular culture through an examination of their American folk elements. Provides students with fieldwork experiences and methods of analysis of oral, customary, and material traditions. No prerequisite. Fall, annually.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 245
Peoples & Cult Of Latin Amer
Introduces the rich variety of ethnic groups and cultures of contemorary Latin America, including Central and South America. Topics will include social structures, economic organization, gender roles, religion, political systems, ethnic identity, an,d globalization. Focus will be on indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on their role in national societies and the international economy.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 250
Prehistoric N America
Examines the development of North American Indian cultures from the beginning of human migration in the late Pleistocene to the coming of Europeans. Emphasizes human interrelationships with the various New World environments in time and space which l,ed to the rise of prehistoric cultures, food production, trade, etc. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 251
Historic Indians N Amer
Surveys American Indians ethnographically. Explores cultural processes, historic events, and ecological adjustments to understand the diversity of Indian culture at the time of their discovery by Europeans. Considers American Indian acculturation and, contemporary Indian issues. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 253
Arch East N America
Provides detailed survey of prehistoric developments in North America east of the Mississippi from Late Pleistocene to the Colonial Period. Familiarizes students with the prehistory of the Amerind populations in the area, including the gradual emerge,nce of the Woodland pattern. On demand.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 254
Language And Culture
An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Focuses on the main areas of intersection between language and culture. Topics may include: animal communication systems; primate language studies, the evolution of language; linguistic diversity; lingui,stic relativity (a.k.a. the Sapir/Whorf hypothesis); language and identity; language and gender; and the ethnography of speaking. From an examination of such topics students will learn to see how people use language to create and maintain their cult,ures, and to recognize the ways in which language itself influences human thought and behavior.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 262
Intro To Eng Lang
Deals generally with the nature of language and specifically with the grammatical structures of modern English, its regional and social varieties, and certain highlights of its historical development. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 300
Lab Meth In Archaeology
Provides a hands-on overview of the major analytical methods in archaeology and a basic understanding of both the practical application of standard methodologies, and the questions archaeologists address. Prerequisite: ANTH 211. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 315
Ending Poverty
Introduces the field of development anthropology, including its applied aspects. Explores the history of development theory; models of cultural change; contemporary issues of poverty and globalization; models of program design. Provides students wi,th a practical background in project design, assessment, and management. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Alternate years|
Undergraduate
ANTH 352
Topics In Folklore
Provides intense study of one or more aspects of folklore study. Focuses on one or more folk groups, a particular folk genre, folklore and popular culture, or folklore and literature. Offers students a fieldwork experience-collection, transcription,,classification-and methods of analysis of oral traditions. No prerequisite. Spring, annually.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 357
Aztec, Inca, & Their Ancestors
Surveys Indian cultures from the beginnings in the Late Pleistocene to the coming of the Conquistadors. Emphasizes cultural developments, the rise of states, native agriculture, and the development of arts and crafts, including architecture and cerem,onial art. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 358
World Prehistory
This course covers the cultural development of humanking from the Lower Paleolithic to the beginnings of urbanism in the Bronze and Iron Age. The course examines human development in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the New World; draws comparisons beween,cultures; studies the diffusion of cultural traits; and summarizes recent developments in research. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 361
Witchcraft, Magic, Rel
Provides cross cultural comparative analysis of human environment with the supernatural. Explores the role of religion and theories dealing with the nature and function of various aspects of supernaturalism from an anthropological perspective. No pre,requisite. Every second year.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 362
Hist and Meth of Anth
Provides a general overview of the history of anthropology as an academic discipline, combined with a survey of anthropological theory and research methods. Alternative years. Anth 211 plus at least 3 additional credits in anthropology, or permission, of instructor.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 364
American Voices
Provides an introduction to American dialectology and sociolinguistics. Emphasizes the great diversity and vitality of American English. Covers the causes and mechanisms of linguistic changes, the role of language differences in society, and the rele,vance of dialectology to language teaching. Pays special attention to the regional speech patterns of Pennsylvania. No prerequisite. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 366
Race & Ethnic Relations
Background of racial and ethnic identity. Examines contemporary aspects of inter-ethnic and inter-racial group relations. Considers proposals for alleviating and resolving problems and their implications. Prerequisite: SOC 211 or permission of the in,structor. Once annually.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 374
Research Seminar In Anth
Investigates how to research, write, and present a substantive anthropological project. Each student will work on an individualized project by developing a research design, performing background research, collecting and analyzing data, and writing a, formal paper that will be presented in class. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. Spring, alternate years|
Undergraduate
ANTH 375
Archaeological Field Sch
Provides undergraduates with a practical and technical background in modern archaeological research. Includes an introduction to cultural contexts. Covers all phases of field investigation, including site reconnaissance, site survey and testing, site, mapping, controlled excavation, specimen recovery techniques, and information regarding procedures. Includes laboratory methods such as catalog and preservation procedures.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 376
Adv Arch Field School
Provides students with additional training in archaeological field methods. Students obtain supervisory skills and experience in site interpretation and report writing. Students will also learn applied archaeological (Cultural Resources Management), field techniques. ANTH 376 is offered concurrently with ANTH 375. Prerequisite: ANTH 375.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 380
Language And Culture
An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Focuses on the main areas of intersection between language and culture. Topics may include: animal communication systems; primate language studies; the evolution of language; linguistic diversity; linguis,tic relativity (a.k.a. the Sapir/Whorf Hypothesis); language endangerment and revival; nonverbal communication; linguistic field methods; ethnopoetics; sociolinguistics; language and identity; language and gender; and the ethnography of speaking. Fr,om an examination of such topics, students will learn to see how people use language to create and maintain their cultures, and to recognize the ways in which language itself influences human thought and behavior.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 400
Individual Research
Allows students to develop their approach to a specific problem, by conducting individual research defined in conference with the instructor. Regular sessions with the faculty member in charge evaluate the progress of the work and chart its direction,. Students expected to acquire research techniques in dealing with their topics. All branches of anthropology may be used to select a topic. Credit and grades will be given only if the project (term paper, survey, investigation, etc.) has been comple,ted to the satisfaction of the project advisor and the departmental chair. Prerequisite: ANTH 211. On demand.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 425
Field School Cultural Anth
Provides students with field experience in cultural anthropology. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experience of ethnographic fieldwork. Focus is on research design, qualitative methodology, and communication results of research. Prerequisite: At, least 6 credits in anthropology, or permission of instructor.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 426
Spec Topics Biol Anth & Arch
Focuses on a single topic of interest in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology. Course content varies. Topic will be announced in advance. Prerequisite: ANTH 211 or permission of instructor.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 427
Special Topics In Cult Anth
Focuses on a single topic of interest in cultural and/or linguistic anthropology. Course content varies. Topic will be announced in advance. Prerequisite: ANTH 211 or permission of instructor.|
Undergraduate
ANTH 457
Intro To Linguistics
Presents key concepts and basic analytical procedures common to many contemporary linguistics theories. Covers phonetics and phonology, morphology, and syntax in detail. Analyzes the integration of these sub-systems in the overall design of a generat,ive grammar. Prerequisite: ANTH/ENG 262. Fall, annually.|
Undergraduate
COOP 301
Coop Anthropology
|
Undergraduate
COOP 401
Intrn-Anthropology
|
Undergraduate
ES 111
Basic Earth Science
Surveys the earth sciences, including Earth-space relations. Includes Earth motions, development of landforms, weather and climate, soils and related vegetation, water as a resource, and oceans. Emphasizes the lithosphere (mountain building and erosi,on) and the atmosphere. Each semester. ES 111 or permission of instructor.|
Undergraduate
ES 140
Natural Disasters
Focuses on natural disasters and the normal processes of the earth/atmosphere system which produce them. Particular attention is placed on the energy sources that cause underlying disasters such as plate tectonics, weather/storm processes, climate c,hange, processes operating in rock, water and the atmosphere, the significance of geologic time, complexities of multiple variables operating simultaneously, and detailed case histories of significant events. The course is acceptable for natural sci,ence credits. Prerequisite: none. Annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 150
Physical Geology w/Lab
Study of the earth, including minerals and rocks, and the processes, both constructional and destructional, which have shaped it since it was formed. Constructional processes include volcanism, mountain building, and sedimentation. Destructional proc,esses include the erosional activity of streams, glaciers, ground water, waves, and wind. Acquaints students with the methods and work of geologists and with some of the research at the frontiers of geology. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. N,o prerequisites. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 160
Explorations In Earth Sci
Designed to fully explore the physical landscape of a predetermined region/location. The chosen region/location varies annually. Interactions between climate, weather, landscape evolution, soils, water resources, oceanographic influences (where app,licable), glacial processes (where applicable), and plate tectonics are examined relative to the resulting physical environment for the region/location. Online and field methodologies are combined to examine applicable physical processes. A capston,e field course will be administered during the last week of the semester to directly explore the region/location. The course is acceptable for natural science credits. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Annually during summer.|
Undergraduate
ES 200
Solar System Astron
Examines the motions of Earth, moon, and the planets and their effects on the appearance of the sky; the nature of the sun and the planets; the instruments of the astronomer; and the role the history of astronomy played in the development of our unde,rstanding of the sky. Includes constellation identification through the use of the planetarium. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 201
Stellar Astronomy
Explores human understanding of the nature, formation, and evolution of those celestial objects that lie beyond the solar system. Includes stellar properties and spectra, stellar evolution, special stars and star systems, the milky way and other gala,xies, cosmology, and cosmogony. Uses the planetarium for constellation study and the development of coordinate systems. Prerequisite: ES 200. Spring, annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 210
Fund of Digital Mapping
Introduces the basic knowledge required to work with digital maps. General and specialized online and desktop mapping options are discussed, and an introduction to the geo-spatial technologies, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global P,ositioning Systems (GPS) and Remote Sensing is emphasized. The potential uses of those technologies in the areas such as environmental studies, forestry, marketing, demographics, and utilities are also presented.|
Undergraduate
ES 225
Cartography I With Lab
Systematic study of basic concepts and components of thematic map-making. Emphasizes familiarization with and utilization of drafting instruments and equipment essential to map design and construction. Presents techniques of photographic reproduction, of student map projects. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or consent of instructor. Offered annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 250
Historical Geology w/Lab
Deals with the changes the Earth has experienced through time. Emphasizes the geologic evidence for plate tectonic movements of ocean basins and continents, uplift and erosion of mountains, and deposition of strata in various sedimentary basins. Exam,ines in detail the evolutionary changes and mass extinction of life-forms, as preserved in the fossil record. Prerequisite: ES 150 (may be taken concurrently). Offered Spring Semester annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 255
Geomorphology With Lab
Study of the physical forces that sculpt and modify the landforms of the earth, including chiefly weathering, streams, glaciation, and shore processes. Includes some preliminary work on topographic and geologic maps and rocks. Called geomorphology in, older catalogs. Prerequisite: ES 150. Offered annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 260
Environmental Geology
Examines the uses of geology in the solution of human problems with the physical environment. Includes hazardous geologic environments, mineral and energy resources, water supply, waste disposal, and the uses of geology in urban and regional planning,. Draws many examples from western Pennsylvania. Prerequisite: ES 150 or 111. Offered annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 270
Oceanography
A study of the physical properties, marine biology, chemistry, and geology of the oceans, and to a minor extent, the role of the sea in the history, culture, and technical developments of humankind. Once annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 280
Meteorology
Introduces the earth's atmosphere. Emphasizes the laws and underlying principles of atmospheric motion and change, earth-sun relationships, atmospheric composition and structure, the general circulation of the atmosphere, winds and wind systems, the,precipitation process, and the genesis and life cycle of storms. Prerequisite: ES 111.|
Undergraduate
ES 300
Special Topics
Topics of special interest in various areas of earth science. The professor selects and designs the format most suitable to the study. Enrollment by consent of the instructor.|
Undergraduate
ES 310
Intro To Geophysics
Explores theoretical and exploration geophysics, including physical characteristics of the earth such as its shape, rotation, and procession; seismology and the interior conditions of the earth; geomagnetism and paleomagnetism; radioactivity and dati,ng techniques; gravity and tides; internal heat; well logging; electrical techniques, such as resistivity; and plate tectonics and its mechanisms. Prerequisites: ES 150, 250, PH 251, 252; or permission of instructor. Every other year.|
Undergraduate
ES 325
Cartography II With Lab
A systematic study of the new dimensions of cartography in use today. Emphasizes the techniques used in the construction of three-dimensional maps and models of statistical surfaces, diagrams, cartograms, negative scribing, and color separation. Two,lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Every other year.|
Undergraduate
ES 330
Hydrogeology With Lab
Hydrogeology deals with both surface water and groundwater in the hydrologic cycle using quantitative methods. Examines aquifer systems, water wells, water quality, water resource management, groundwater flow, and pollutant transport in detail during, labs, field trips, and site tours. Prerequisite: ES 150. Offered Fall Semester annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 345
Computer Cartog w/Lab
Systematic study of the newest dimension of cartography in use today. Designing and constructing computer maps is an integral part of the course. Students create computer maps with a number of programs, including Atlas Graphics, Atlas Draw, Microam,,Map Info. PC Globe, PS USA, Systate, etc. Introduces the use of the digitizer. Prerequisite CIS 110 or equivalent course, or consent of the instructor. Every other spring.|
Undergraduate
ES 350
Structural Geology
Investigates the geometry, origin, and recognition of the main structural features of the rocks of the earth's crust, including folds, faults, joints, unconformities, larger igneous bodies, cleavage, lineation, etc. Explores interpreting structure fr,om geologic maps, structural petrology, and geophysical methods used in structural geology. Prerequisite: ES 150. Every third semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 355
Invert Paleontol
Explores the outstanding invertebrate animals preserved in the fossil record. Examines the nature of the fossil record itself, evolution as shown by fossils, and classification problems in paleontology. Prerequisite: ES 250. Every other year.|
Undergraduate
ES 360
Mineralogy
Examines the identification, uses, physical and chemical properties, occurrence, origin, and crystallography of the common minerals. Prerequisite: At least high school chemistry. Every third semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 370
Petrology
The identification, occurrence and origin, classification, physical and chemical properties, and uses of the common rocks. Includes a brief study of the important rock forming minerals. Prerequisite: ES 150. Every third semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 385
Climatology
Examines the major components of climate and climate change. Analyzes physical aspects of the atmosphere as a series of long-term weather phenomena. Studies regional characteristics of climate on the basis of worldwide weather patterns. Emphasizes, how applied aspects of climate demonstrate the interrelationships and importance of both physical and regional climatology to humankind. Also examines the causes of long-term climate change and variability. Acceptable for social science or natural, science credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.|
Undergraduate
ES 390
Strat & Sedime Petrology
Systematic study of clastic and carbonate stratigraphic sequences, emphasizing interpretation of lithofacies, tectono-sedimentary settings, and sequence stratigraphy. Laboratories include study of petrologic/diagenetic characteristics of sedimentary,strata, recent advances in seismic stratigraphy, and basin analysis. Prerequisite: ES 150. (ES 250, ES 360, and ES 370 are recommended.) Every third semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 400
Intro Remote Sensing/Lab
Explores aerial photographs for geographic investigation of physical and cultural features of the landscape; the application of remote sensing to topographic and planimetric map construction, agricultural and land use identification, landform study,,and forestry. Each Fall Semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 404
Soils With Lab
Comprehensively examines the classification, formation, and interpretation of soils. Students examine the processes of soil classification (both the zonal classification and the soil taxonomy classification), soil formation (parent material, climate,, slope, time and organic activity), and the interpretation of pedogenic sequences (as it relates to deposition, diagenesis, and climate change). Laboratory (one credit, two hours) complements lecture portion of the course. Emphasizes the field interp,retation of soils as well as the geochemistry and textual classification of soils. Prerequisites: ES 150 and 255 or permission of the instructor.|
Undergraduate
ES 425
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Examines satellite-based earth imaging instruments, data sources, and products, and their applications to land use management, geologic assessments, agriculture, forestry, soil resources, archeology, meteorology, and oceanography. Utilizes visual and, digital data. Prerequisite: GEOG 400 (can be waived by permission of instructor). Every Spring.|
Undergraduate
ES 450
Field Geography w/Lab
Explores techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn the techniques and procedures of rural and urban land use, surveying, and field research. Prerequisites: c,onsent of instructor. Summer on demand.|
Undergraduate
ES 455
Field Methods in Geoscience
Field-based course provides upper-level undergraduates hands-on experience in hydrogeology, meteorology, bedrock, and surficial geology projects. Group projects include GIS-based analysis of a small watershed, geologic mapping, and measurement of a s,tratigraphic section, soils and terrace mapping, and surveying a strip mine remediation site. Emphasizes proper use of traditional and state-of-the-art instruments and equipment. Prerequisites: ES 150 and ES 330. Offered Summer Session I annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 460
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
Undergraduate
ES 470
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. These include an entire sequence of build,ing spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 (can be waived by instructor),. Fall, annually.|
Undergraduate
ES 476
Sci Tech & Soc: Topics
Interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint students with information, curricula and teaching methodologies appropriate for integrating STS topics into science and social studies instruction. Includes topics in nature of science, history of scien,ce, history of technology, ethical decision-making, and the influences of changes in sciecne and technology on society. Required for all secondary science and social studies education majors. Spring semester. Prerequisite: Junior Standing|
Undergraduate
ES 481
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
Undergraduate
ES 490
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem solving in applied settings. Lecture and application-/project-based. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduce stud,ents to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 470. Each Spring Semester.|
Undergraduate
ES 500
Intro Arphoto Int Rem Sens
Study and assessment of the physical and cultural features of the earth using satellite images and aerial photographs. Uses black and white photos, color infrared photos, and digital satellite images for planimetric map construction, agricultural and, vegetation studies, landform identification, land use assessment, and forestry. Laboratory activities include analysis of imagery in different zones of the electromagnetic spectrum, geometric correction of satellite images, and computer-assisted lan,d cover classification. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or permission of instructor. Fall semester.|
Graduate
ES 525
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Builds on the content of Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation and Remote Sensing. Uses Earth imaging satellites, such as Lansat, SPOT, and Ikonos, and introduces new instruments, including Radarsat, Space Shuttle, and Space Station earth imagine,instruments. Examines various digital data sets including digital elevation models (DEMS), digital orthophotos and digital topographic maps. Students will work together on a drainage basin study to assess the sources of acid pollution using computer-,assisted land cover classification, manual photo interpretation, and field reconnaissance to identify trip mine areas and acid discharging oil/gas wells. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 500. Spring, annually.|
Graduate
ES 550
Field Geography w/Lab
Systematic study of techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn techniques and procedures of compass traversing, plane tabling, rural and urban land use survey,ing, and field research. Prerequisite: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.|
Graduate
ES 555
Field Meth Environ Geos
Field-based course designed to give upper-level students hands-on experience in various aspects of hydrogeology, surficial geology and meteorlogy. Emphasis on principles and practice of the most recent field and laboratory techniques of instrumentati,on, sampling, and monitoring as applied to relevant environmental problems. Prerequisite: ES 260, 280, and 330. Summer session, on demand.|
Graduate
ES 560
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
Graduate
ES 570
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. Lab includes an entire sequence of buildi,ng spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 or permission of instructor. F,all, annually.|
Graduate
ES 581
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
Graduate
ES 590
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem-solving in applied setting. Lecture- and application/project-based course. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduc,e students to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 570. Spring, annually.|
Graduate
GEOG 100
Intro World Geography
Provides an overview of important human and physical characteristics of the world's cultural realms. Examines issues of economic and social development, and religions and cultures found around the world in a regional or systematic context. Explores c,ontemporary environmental, political, and ethnic/racial problems.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 115
Conservation
Integrates the social and natural sciences by examining the concepts, methodologies and history of the Conservation of Natural Resources. Includes soil, water, land, forest, wildlife, energy, clean air, and historic resources. Explores the many contr,oversial issues surrounding the management of public lands and regulation of private land. Examines the rational and logic of federal and state environmental laws. Every fall or spring. (Values Flag.)|
Undergraduate
GEOG 210
Fund of Digital Mapping
Introduces the basic knowledge required to work with digital maps. General and specialized online and desktop mapping options are discussed, and an introduction to the geo-spatial technologies, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global P,ositioning Systems (GPS) and Remote Sensing is emphasized. The potential uses of those technologies in the areas such as environmental studies, forestry, marketing, demographics, and utilities are also presented.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 225
Cartography I With Lab
Systematic study of basic concepts and components of thematic map-making. Emphasizes familiarization with and utilization of drafting instruments and equipment essential to map design and construction. Presents techniques of photographic reproduction, of student map projects. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or consent of instructor. Offered annually.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 244
Planning the Human Environment
The course introduces students to the theory and practice of urban and regional planning. Examines the means and ways of managing land resources with respect to enhancing the use of land for residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural purpos,es. The course focuses on comprehensive planning, planning strategies, planning analysis, regulatory systems and the preservation and conservation of land resources for future generations and for aesthetic purposes. The ecological implications of dev,elopment on natural resources is pivotal in the course in order to explain and analyze growth management practices in urban and rural communities. Offered occasionally.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 257
U.S. & Canada
Analyzes geographic problems, natural and cultural, of the United States and Canada; the synthesis of physical, biotic, economic, and social patterns and problems of geographic regions of North America; the interrelationship of North American politic,al structures and their ties with the rest of the world. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 260
Economic Geog
Explores the production, exchange, and use of the basic commodities of the world; the relationship between the physical factors and economic conditions and the patterns of major economic activities, world trade, and trade routes; economic landscapes;, problems of economic development. Recommended for majors in economics, history, and political science. Every other year.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 300
Special Topics
Topics of special interest in various areas of physical, human, or regional geography. Professor selects format most suitable to the study. Enrollment by consent of the instructor. Offered occasionally.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 310
Sustainable Development
Examines the commonalities developing countries have faced and continue to face in their push toward development, particularly as they relate to the spatial aspects affecting the conditions of the development process. Analyzes theories of growth and,social and economic development, as well as the historical and contemporary relationship between the developed and the developing world. Discusses issues such as population growth and human settlement patterns, the rural/urban dichotomy, industrializ,ation and urbanization, regional trading blocks, transportation and development, and the socio-economic development planning. Examines the impact of cultural elements such as religion and the role of women in development. Writing intensive course. Pr|
Undergraduate
GEOG 315
Human Geog:Race,Class,Ge
Focuses on methods and theories geographers have used to explore how social relations of race, class, and gender have been structured, influenced, and expressed spatially. Exposes students to social/spatial construction theories (the social construct,ion of race and gender, the social production of space, and the role of space in the construction of gender and race), and postmodern economic restructuring and its impact on the location and (race, class, and gender component of the) employment stru,cture of flexible industries. Explores contemporary theories on the role of race/gender and class intersection in the reproduction process, and the colonial and postcolonial geographies of gender and race. Writing intensive course. Prerequisite: None|
Undergraduate
GEOG 325
Cartography II With Lab
A systematic study of the new dimensions of cartography in use today. Emphasizes the techniques used in the construction of three-dimensional maps and models of statistical surfaces, diagrams, cartograms, negative scribing, and color separation. Two,lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Every other year.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 345
Computer Cartog w/Lab
Systematic study of the newest dimension of cartography in use today. Designing and constructing computer maps is an integral part of the course. Students create computer maps with a number of programs, including Atlas Graphics, Atlas Draw, Microam,,Map Info. PC Globe, PS USA, Systate, etc. Introduces the use of the digitizer. Prerequisite CIS 110 or equivalent course, or consent of the instructor. Every other spring.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 358
Geography Of The Caribbean
Study of the Caribbean, with a special tour on the geography and the cultural and socio-economic aspects of the Caribbean. Emphasizes socio-economic history of slavery and the plantation economy, including issues of race relations and their spatial d,imensions. Traces the economic transition away from the plantation economy, the rise of an active black leadership, urbanization and urban planning in the region, attempts at economic and political regional integration, economic development strategie,s of small Caribbean islands, and the impact of tourism as the new mono culture of the region. Offered occasionally.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 385
Climatology
Examines the major components of climate and climate change. Analyzes physical aspects of the atmosphere as a series of long-term weather phenomena. Studies regional characteristics of climate on the basis of worldwide weather patterns. Emphasizes, how applied aspects of climate demonstrate the interrelationships and importance of both physical and regional climatology to humankind. Also examines the causes of long-term climate change and variability. Acceptable for social science or natural, science credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 400
Intro Remote Sensing/Lab
Explores aerial photographs for geographic investigation of physical and cultural features of the landscape; the application of remote sensing to topographic and planimetric map construction, agricultural and land use identification, landform study,,and forestry. Each Fall Semester.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 404
Soils With Lab
Comprehensively examines the classification, formation, and interpretation of soils. Students examine the processes of soil classification (both the zonal classification and the soil taxonomy classification), soil formation (parent material, climate,, slope, time and organic activity), and the interpretation of pedogenic sequences (as it relates to deposition, diagenesis, and climate change). Laboratory (one credit, two hours) complements lecture portion of the course. Emphasizes the field interp,retation of soils as well as the geochemistry and textual classification of soils. Prerequisites: ES 150 and 255 or permission of the instructor.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 425
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Examines satellite-based earth imaging instruments, data sources, and products, and their applications to land use management, geologic assessments, agriculture, forestry, soil resources, archeology, meteorology, and oceanography. Utilizes visual and, digital data. Prerequisite: GEOG 400 (can be waived by permission of instructor). Every Spring.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 450
Field Geography w/Lab
Explores techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn the techniques and procedures of rural and urban land use, surveying, and field research. Prerequisites: c,onsent of instructor. Summer on demand.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 460
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 470
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. These include an entire sequence of build,ing spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 (can be waived by instructor),. Fall, annually.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 481
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 490
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem solving in applied settings. Lecture and application-/project-based. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduce stud,ents to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 470. Each Spring Semester.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 499
Sem: Meth In Geog Resear
Presents the opportunity for students with considerable interest and background in geography to utilize the various methods of analysis of the discipline to examine a concrete issue or research problem. Emphasizes analysis, synthesis, and communicati,on. Students produce a written report and give an oral presentation of their project. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status in geography or permission of instructor. Every other spring.|
Undergraduate
GEOG 500
Intro Arphoto Int Rem Sens
Study and assessment of the physical and cultural features of the earth using satellite images and aerial photographs. Uses black and white photos, color infrared photos, and digital satellite images for planimetric map construction, agricultural and, vegetation studies, landform identification, land use assessment, and forestry. Laboratory activities include analysis of imagery in different zones of the electromagnetic spectrum, geometric correction of satellite images, and computer-assisted lan,d cover classification. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or permission of instructor. Fall semester.|
Graduate
GEOG 525
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Builds on the content of Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation and Remote Sensing. Uses Earth imaging satellites, such as Lansat, SPOT, and Ikonos, and introduces new instruments, including Radarsat, Space Shuttle, and Space Station earth imagine,instruments. Examines various digital data sets including digital elevation models (DEMS), digital orthophotos and digital topographic maps. Students will work together on a drainage basin study to assess the sources of acid pollution using computer-,assisted land cover classification, manual photo interpretation, and field reconnaissance to identify trip mine areas and acid discharging oil/gas wells. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 500. Spring, annually.|
Graduate
GEOG 550
Field Geography w/Lab
Systematic study of techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn techniques and procedures of compass traversing, plane tabling, rural and urban land use survey,ing, and field research. Prerequisite: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.|
Graduate
GEOG 560
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
Graduate
GEOG 570
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. Lab includes an entire sequence of buildi,ng spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 or permission of instructor. F,all, annually.|
Graduate
GEOG 581
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
Graduate
GEOG 590
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem-solving in applied setting. Lecture- and application/project-based course. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduc,e students to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 570. Spring, annually.|
Graduate
MARS 320
Marine Geology
Sedimentary and tectonic characteristics of the continental margins and deep ocean basins; sediment transport and deposition in marine environments; marine geophysical methods at sea; marine mineral resources. Prerequisite: Introductory Geology and O,ceanography. Summer, on demand.|
Undergraduate